Google Chrome for Mac and Linux, and Why That Matters

It has been a little more than a week since stable version of Google Chrome for Mac and Linux was made available by Google. I haven’t tried Mac version, but I’ve tried Linux version.

Linux version supports extensions as much as its Windows counterpart does, and it seems to be they are pretty much compatible out of the box. (which isn’t surprising as they are written mainly in JavaScript.)

Google Chrome is perhaps not adding too much of competition on Linux, as there aren’t so much notion of standard browser, although probably most of distributions are including Firefox as default browser, therefore, I can see it will be start eating some portion of pies from Firefox…

Google Chrome on Mac is more interesting as there is Apple’s own Safari browser. (much like the case of IE on Windows.) It’d be interesting to see how their new version 5, which was released earlier today will compete with it. (word on the street is that Safari now supports extensions.) Though when I used to use Mac, I was on Firefox rather than Safari. I simply didn’t like Safari for some reason.

Google Chrome’s introduction to those additional platform is quite meaningful, because people who are using multiple computers, and often different operating system (for example, Windows at work, Mac/Linux at home) will find Google Chrome’s multi-platform very useful. I can find this availability issue between platforms could defer some users from it. You can use same extensions (which actually somewhat better than Firefox — believe or not, there are Firefox extensions that only supports certain platforms…), same browser sync feature.

Google Chrome won’t be grabbing big chunk of market share overnight, but I can see it slowly approaching to solid two digits sh