Why Windows 8 Will Be Support Nightmare (Especially in Small Businesses)

Windows 8 offers a radically new interface for computers, with new features like new Metro (what do they call it now? Windows 8 interface?) and other features, or non-features like lack of the Start button.

So why this is bad for small businesses? Simply put, it is bad for small businesses, unless whoever taking charge of IT in the organization is a Microsoft fanboy. In the context of small businesses I’m talking here, it is a size of around 3 to 10. (If the company is small enough, that it is only by yourself, or with just one other person, this is probably less relevant as IT administration is more of personal user than business users.)

So what small businesses lack that bigger corporation don’t? Usually, it comes down to more unstructured, and unorganized IT policies and privileges.

To name a few:

  • Smaller companies lack well defined upgrade path. Upgrade happens whenever the system gets updated. If the company is not big enough to take advantage of volume licensing, upgrade paths are often tied to the system being replaced.
  • Generally speaking, smaller businesses do not have access to downgrade privilege.
  • IT human resources for small businesses may not necessarily be dedicated. They may be wearing more than one hat beside IT. This means skill set of IT staffing in smaller company may be motivation driven — for instance, one who are investing more time on Linux or Mac may not be willing to improve their support ability in the new aspect of Windows 8 even when they are already knowledgeable in general know how.

I am maintaining IT assets for company size of 4 people, and it has been already bad enough when I have to support iOS devices — often I have to resort to unhelpful response, “I don’t know, I don’t use iOS.” Being a LibreOffice user (with a copy of Microsoft Office 2007 installed on the VM for occasionally compatibility, that I rarely boots up) I am more comfortable supporting Microsoft Office 2003 than what’s offered in those “ribbon interface” which makes it very difficult to support the application as well. (After all, I consider myself to be a computing expert, not vendor expert.)

So, yeah, this is pretty scary when it is time to upgrade a machine in the office is newer device. Hopefully, configuration of those devices is close enough that Windows 7 would be enough.