Should we give Firefox another chance?

While the Mozilla Firefox vs. Google Chrome seems to be a topic that comes up once in a while, while the recently, it is dwarfed by close to 60% of the market share by Chrome.  Recently there was an article called It’s time to give Firefox another chance.

The article emphasizes that the next version of Firefox Quantum will be the major release for Firefox.

I have been using Chrome as my primary web browser for a long time, while before, I have been using Firefox. But recently, I am finding I am using more Firefox more often.

From few different perspective, here are my thought on this topic. With this article, I am not making assertion that the one browser is better than others, but to get the foundation out so it can be compared time to time.

Platform Support

Chrome and Firefox both supports Windows, Linux, and Mac. Thus they are on par with this perspective.

Feature Comparisons

Browser Sync

Chrome supports syncing via Google Sync, and Firefox via Firefox Account. They offer similar functionality. Both Chrome and Firefox offer encrypted sync. Perhaps Firefox’s sync feature is a little more comprehensive as it supports history syncing while Chrome seems to be limited in this regard.

Security

Both Chrome and Firefox are discovered with good number of security issues. (and it is important they are addressed in timely manners, too!) Discussing these can be article of its own, so I am focusing here regarding the security feature.

Chrome has been supporting sandboxing and most recent version of Firefox is supporting it as well. From more robust multi process design with Chrome (more of that in later) perhaps in this area, Chrome has bit of edge compared to Firefox.

One thing I like about Firefox that lacks on Chrome is the support of master password, which you can lock password store with the master password.

Also Firefox has a useful extension called Firefox Multi-Account Containers, which can isolate session cookies, which makes it easier to confine certain sites (like Facebook) to reduce tracking.

Chrome has recently moved toward hiding security information from the browser interface, perhaps to make it more user friendly. One illustration of this problem is that they are making jump through some hoops to be able to look up certificate information. (Through developer tools.) While this can be turned back on through experimental features, it is bit concerning they are hiding this information for the sake of user friendliness; if that’s the reason.

Operating System Integration

Chrome uses operating system’s own certificate management where available, which makes it easy to integrate in environment where internal certificate (while this is not a best practice, but it happens!) or internal Active Directory authentications are used.

Firefox, in contrast, uses Network Security Service, which basically is a security storage independent of the system. This makes the system less integrated with the one configured through the system. While configuring Active Directory authentication for Firefox is certainly possible, it is not a simple one-click process.

With this regard, Chrome seems to integrate a little better with the operating system.

Google Service Integration

This is somewhat silly notion when Chrome is designed by Google who owns those Google services. One of the major blocking factor is if there’s Chromecast involved, as at least from the desktop, there is no practical way to control it outside of Chrome.

Other than that, aside from some services that heavily expect Chrome to be used, most of Google Service should work on both of those browsers.

Mobile Versions

With extensions support, it appears Firefox for Android, also known as Fennec feels like a mobile port of the desktop version rather than the scaled down version, which is the way every time I use Chrome I can’t help notice.

Internal Designs

Chrome is designed from the ground up with multi-process utilization in mind, which this development was relatively recent with Firefox. While they work similar, with this regard, perhaps Chrome has a slight advantage of this in stability. Multi process support for Firefox, called Electrolysis can be disengaged for having incompatible feature sets (like accessibility) or extensions. This problem usually comes from the older type of extensions, and perhaps will soon go away when Firefox 57 only supports WebExtension.

Other Features I Love

Firefox features a reader mode. This mode is very useful when reading long article as it removes a lot of clutter off the document. (Also supported on a mobile version as well!)

 

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