4+ Things I don’t Miss About Windows

So now I have transitioned my desktop into Linux, this means I no longer have any system that runs Windows (at least at native capacity.)

1. No more crappy update systems

Apparently, Windows has a defect (that roots from Windows XP) on its Windows Update driver, that can cause very high disk load on every startup/resume, mainly, for parsing datastore.edb file. This actually caused in bit of issues trying to use my system. Essentially, every time I turn on my machine to use, it’d take at least 10 minutes to “stabilize.” This has happened in three of prior systems, and latest machine, which is i7-2600 with 16GB didn’t help solve this issue either.

Besides, I have a lot of complaints of how the update system works on Windows. Unfortunately, Windows pretty much requires restart and just about any updates, perhaps thanks to its locking file system, too.

2. I am no longer underprivileged citizen of the system

Why am I getting “Access denied” when you are using your machine as Administrator? Because on Windows, you are not the man of the house. Windows has layers of the system that prevents people from doing stupid things in their system.

Essentially, on Windows, you are prevented to do a lot of stupid things. This mentality often causes cases where I know what I’m doing, but the system is not letting me do that.

For instance, on Linux and other Unix system, you can cause a bit of damage by doing something like:

sudo rm -rf /*

I am more than willing to take a risk, and if this command does kill my system, that’s my own fault. After all great power comes with great responsibilities.

 3. Exiting out from the blackbox

In any computing, you can’t really escape from error messages. Things happen in many degrees of issues. Some are minor, and some are major. If anything goes crazy on Linux, I can usually just type dmesg to find out what exactly happened in few seconds. Windows also has logging facility, but even after spending a long time trying to boot system event logs, information I can get is extremely limited. Something as simple as a defective thumb drive is a bit hard to investigate under Windows.

4. Locking file system

You can’t delete or move files that are in use. This is somewhat a legacy from old Windows versions. On Linux, you can do these things as executables are mostly preloaded into RAM, hence many system updates don’t require a reboot of the system.  Most of system has more RAM than you ever use, so this is very ridiculous notion that you still can’t do this on Windows.

Ranting continues…

Another thing I want to point out is that Microsoft has been harsh on IT professionals (well, I don’t know if I’d call myself “IT professional” but I do maintain a handful of systems…) lately. TechNet Plus was a useful resource in evaluating softwares, so I can support the platform that I don’t necessarily use. First, they degraded its contents of the subscription, and then they decided to retire it altogether. I was paying my own hard earned money to stay on top of the platforms I have been supporting. An enterprise may be able to move to MSDN, but smaller business, which relies heavily on personal expertise of staff, this won’t be very realistic. Anyways, Microsoft no longer seems to care. So why should I care? That’s pretty much what I will have to tell people from now on.